It is an unofficial and free outlook-vba ebook created for educational purposes. All the content It is neither affiliated with Stack Overflow nor official outlook-vba. A outlook-vba eBooks created from contributions of Stack Overflow users. Argumentless procedures written in Outlook VBA can be launched as . Microsoft Outlook VBA Tutorial -- eBook that demonstrates the general use of VBA text.

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Outlook Vba Ebook

NET and C# from Visual Studio, will find Outlook VBA useful for exploring Microsoft Outlook VBA Tutorial -- eBook that demonstrates the general use of VBA. The following macro describes how you can extract information from the email and create a corresponding message in your email text. For example if you are. Downloadable books on Microsoft Office VBA, Excel and Access for trainers and Excel, FrontPage, Outlook, PowerPoint, Project, Publisher, Visio and Word).

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Another button on the Developer tab in Word and Excel is the Record Macro button, which automatically generates VBA code that can reproduce the actions that you perform in the application. Record Macro is a terrific tool that you can use to learn more about VBA.

Reading the generated code can give you insight into VBA and provide a stable bridge between your knowledge of Office as a user and your knowledge as a programmer.

The only caveat is that the generated code can be confusing because the Macro editor must make some assumptions about your intentions, and those assumptions are not necessarily accurate. To record a macro Open Excel to a new Workbook and choose the Developer tab in the ribbon.

Choose Record Macro and accept all of the default settings in the Record Macro dialog box, including Macro1 as the name of the macro and This Workbook as the location. Choose OK to begin recording the macro. Note how the button text changes to Stop Recording. Choose that button the instant you complete the actions that you want to record.

Choose cell B1 and type the programmer's classic first string: Hello World. Stop typing and look at the Stop Recording button; it is grayed out because Excel is waiting for you to finish typing the value in the cell. Choose cell B2 to complete the action in cell B1, and then choose Stop Recording.

Figure 2. Macro code in Visual Basic Editor Looking at the code The macro that you created should look similar to the following code. Select ActiveCell. Select End Sub Be aware of the similarities to the earlier code snippet that selected text in cell A1, and the differences. In this code, cell B1 is selected, and then the string "Hello World" is applied to the cell that has been made active. The quotes around the text specify a string value as opposed to a numeric value.

Remember how you chose cell B2 to display the Stop Recording button again? That action shows up as a line of code as well.

The macro recorder records every keystroke. The lines of code that start with an apostrophe and colored green by the editor are comments that explain the code or remind you and other programmers the purpose of the code. VBA ignores any line, or portion of a line, that begins with a single quote. Writing clear and appropriate comments in your code is an important topic, but that discussion is out of the scope of this article.

Subsequent references to this code in the article do not include those four comment lines. When the macro recorder generates the code, it uses a complex algorithm to determine the methods and the properties that you intended.

If you do not recognize a given property, there are many resources available to help you. For example, in the macro that you recorded, the macro recorder generated code that refers to the FormulaR1C1 property. Not sure what that means?

The code that you recorded works with Application. The Help system runs a quick search, determines that the appropriate subjects are in the Excel Developer section of the Excel Help, and lists the FormulaR1C1 property.

You can choose the link to read more about the property, but before you do, be aware of the Excel Object Model Reference link near the bottom of the window.

Choose the link to view a long list of objects that Excel uses in its object model to describe the Worksheets and their components. Choose any one of those to see the properties and methods that apply to that particular object, along with cross references to different related options. Many Help entries also have brief code examples that can help you. For example, you can follow the links in the Borders object to see how to set a border in VBA.

Worksheets 1. One thing that can be confusing with an object model is that there is more than one way to address any given object, cell A1 in this example.

Sometimes the best way to learn programming is to make minor changes to some working code and see what happens as a result. Try it now. Open Macro1 in the Visual Basic Editor and change the code to the following.

Sub Macro1 Worksheets 1. You do not need to save the code to try it out, so return to the Excel document, choose Macros on the Developer tab, choose Macro1, and then choose Run. Cell A1 now contains the text Wow! Figure 3. Results of your first macro You just combined macro recording, reading the object model documentation, and simple programming to make a VBA program that does something.

Did not work? Read on for debugging suggestions in VBA. Programming tips and tricks Start with examples The VBA community is very large; a search on the Web can almost always yield an example of VBA code that does something similar to what you want to do.

If you cannot find a good example, try to break the task down into smaller units and search on each of those, or try to think of a more common, but similar problem. Starting with an example can save you hours of time. That does not mean that free and well-thought-out code is on the Web waiting for you to come along. In fact, some of the code that you find might have bugs or mistakes.

More Outlook Resource Sites

The idea is that the examples you find online or in VBA documentation give you a head start. Remember that learning programming requires time and thought.

Before you get in a big rush to use another solution to solve your problem, ask yourself whether VBA is the right choice for this problem. Make a simpler problem Programming can get complex quickly. It is critical, especially as a beginner, that you break the problem down to the smallest possible logical units, then write and test each piece in isolation. If you have too much code in front of you and you get confused or muddled, stop and set the problem aside.

When you come back to the problem, copy out a small piece of the problem into a new module, solve that piece, get the code working, and test it to ensure that it works.

Mastering VBA for Microsoft Office 2016

Then move on to the next part. Bugs and debugging There are two main types of programming errors: syntax errors, which violate the grammatical rules of the programming language, and run-time errors, which look syntactically correct, but fail when VBA attempts to execute the code.

Although they can be frustrating to fix, syntax errors are easy to catch; the Visual Basic Editor beeps and flashes at you if you type a syntax error in your code.

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For example, string values must be surrounded by double quotes in VBA. To find out what happens when you use single quotes instead, return to the Visual Basic Editor and replace the "Wow! If you choose the next line, the Visual Basic Editor reacts. The error "Compile error: Expected: expression" is not that helpful, but the line that generates the error turns red to tell you that you have a syntax error in that line and as a result, this program will not run.

Choose OK and change the text back to"Wow! Runtime errors are harder to catch because the programming syntax looks correct, but the code fails when VBA tries to execute it. For example, open the Visual Basic Editor and change the Value property name toValueX in your Macro, deliberately introducing a runtime error since the Range object does not have a property called ValueX. Go back to the Excel document, open the Macros dialog box and run Macro1 again.

You should see a Visual Basic message box that explains the run-time error with the text, "Object doesn't support this property of method. When you return to the Visual Basic Editor, it is in a special debug mode that uses a yellow highlight to show you the line of code that failed.

Visual Basic and VBA Coding in Microsoft Outlook

As expected, the line that includes the ValueX property is highlighted. You can make changes to VBA code that is running, so change ValueX back to Value and choose the little green play button underneath the Debug menu.

The program should run normally again. Microsoft Outlook is the most widely used email program, and it offers the most programmability. This book introduces key concepts for programming both Outlook forms for storing and exchanging data and Visual Basic for Applications modules that add new features to Outlook.

Central to this new edition, which covers both Outlook and Outlook , is awareness of tighter security in Outlook. Designed to prevent transmission of computer viruses, the security restrictions can also get in the way of legitimate programs, but this book offers workarounds within the reach of novice programmers. It also covers many of the new features of Outlook , such as the integrated Outlook View Control and searching across multiple folders using SQL syntax and the Search object.

Sue Mosher is the author of six previous books on Microsoft Outlook and Exchange and maintains a web site at http: Her company, Turtleflock LLC, helps organizations get the most out of Outlook and other Microsoft Office products, providing custom application development and other support.

Sue has been recognized by Microsoft with a Most Valuable Professional award every year since I highly recommend this book for everyone working in Outlook and also for more advanced users who want to learn the tricks of programming Outlook. Her web site www. I'll often try to find the answer I'm looking for there before using Microsoft's internal tools to research an issue.

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Thanks in advance for your time. Thanks - I've done that but I haven't been able to find a book. Will keep this open for a while longer. Download eBook now!

I've notice that but it is for and I'm using It doesn't matter. With the latest Outlook edition it provides pretty much everything you need to create advanced VBA macros. Almost everything works the same way in Outlook Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by Your issues matter to us. I ordered it.

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