English verb tenses pdf


 

something happens repeatedly. • how often something happens. • one action follows another. • things in general. • with verbs like (to love, to hate, to think, etc.). PDF + online grammar rules and exercises on all English tenses. Present, past + future tenses, present perfect, past perfect and future perfect. Shayna Oliveira The Complete List of. English Verb Tenses. Do you find English verbs confusing? Take a look at this chart of English verb tenses to help.

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English Verb Tenses Pdf

(4) Present Perfect Continuous– This tense shows the action which started in the past and is e.g. I had been learning English in this school for 20 days. 1. Assertive In Future Tense helping verb 'Shall' is used with 'I' and 'We'. Helping verb. Tenses. All downloads are in PDF Format and consist of a worksheet and answer sheet to check your results. Levels of Difficulty: Elementary Intermediate. The basic forms of the English verb tenses: positive negative question present simple subject + verb (+ s). I eat. She eats toast. subject + do / does + not + verb.

If you stopped native English tenses. In each lesson we look at two aspects of the speakers in the street and asked them about tense: tense, one of them might give you an intelligent answer—if you were lucky. And they would know nothing about aspect, voice Some lessons look at additional aspects, and most of or mood. But they can all speak fluent them finish with a quiz to check your understanding. English and communicate effectively. I do do, I do Be like those native speakers! Speak Present Continuous Tense naturally! For positive sentences, we do not normally use the auxiliary. For the 3rd person singular he, she, it , we add s to the main verb or es to the auxiliary. For the verb to be, we do not use an auxiliary, even for questions and negatives. Look at these examples with the main verb like: subject auxiliary verb main verb I, you, we, they like coffee. I, you, we, they do not like coffee. Do I, you, we, they like coffee?

Have we been going? Have you been going? Has she been going? Has he been going? Have they been going? The Past indefinite Tense Past tense describes action happing in the past. The past tense is formed from the past form of the verb.

Affirmative sentence. Examples:- Subject Verb I went. We went.

English tenses

You went. He went. She went. It went. They went. Negative Sentence. Examples;- Subject Did Not infinitive I did not go. We did not go. You did not go. He did not go.

She did not go. It did not go. They did not go. Interrogative sentences. It ends in question mark. Did we go? Did you go? Did he go? Did she go?

Did it go? Did they go? Past Continuous Tense The past continuous means that at a time in the past we were in the middle of and action. Present participle is used with helping verb for this tense. Example:- He was cooking dinner for his wife. Affirmative, negative and interrogative sentences 1. Affirmative sentence An affirmative sentence contains subject, helping verb, verb and object.

Examples;- Subject Helping verb Verb I was going. We were going. You were going. He was going. She was going. It was going. Negative Sentences. We were not going. You were not going. He was not going. She was not going. It was not going. They were not going. Were we going? Were you going?

Was he going? Was she going? Was it going? Were they going? Past Perfect Tense The past perfect tense describes action happening in the past before some other past tense action. Affirmative Sentences. The affirmative sentence contains subject, helping verb, and verb. Subject helping verb verb I had gone. We had gone. You had gone. He had gone. She had gone. It had gone. They had gone. We had not gone. You had not gone.

He had not gone. She had not gone. It had not gone. They had not gone. Had we gone? Had you gone? Had he gone? Had she gone? Had it gone? Had they gone? Past perfect continuous tense It is used to denote an action that was finished at some definite time in the past, but which had been going on before it was finished: as, 1. We had been playing hockey for twenty minutes. The prepositions since and for are used to denote a point of time and a period of time respectively.

The affirmative sentence contains subject, helping verb and verb. Example:- Subject Helping verb Verb I had been going. We had been going. You had been going. He had been going. She had been going. Negative sentences. We had not been going. You had not been going. He had not been going. Marry would have worked in leading companies next month. Marry would not have worked in leading companies next month.

Should your mother have been here at nine oclock tomorrow? Would Marry have worked in leading companies next month? Yes, she should. Yes, she would. Would you have been working in leading companies for 10 years? Yes, I would. You can find here all tense rule in English with Example. So that you can learn easily. Flag for inappropriate content. Related titles. Tense chart for translation from Punjabi to English. Jump to Page. Search inside document. All Tense Rule chart or Table in English 1.

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Tenses - PDF Worksheets - English Vocabulary and Grammar

Khushal Khan "Khugiani". Hemanth Kumar. Vikas Singla. MOhammad ZOhaib. Mubarak Abdessalami.

Popular in Grammatical Tenses. Antonia Anto. Sarah Nazril. Clerenda Mcgrady. Andre Kresviansya. Mary Lou. Bachchan Mishra. Fita Yanti. The Jurassic period lasted about 62 million years. We did not sing at the concert.

Did you watch TV last night? Notice that it does not matter how long ago the event is: it can be a few minutes or seconds in the past, or millions of years in the past. Also it does not matter how long the event is.

It can be a few milliseconds car explosion or millions of years Jurassic period. Note that when we tell a story, we usually use the simple past tense. We may use the past continuous tense to "set the scene", but we almost always use the simple past tense for the action. Look at this example of the beginning of a story: "The wind was howling around the hotel and the rain was pouring down.

It was cold. The door opened and James Bond entered. He took off his coat, which was very wet, and ordered a drink at the bar. He sat down in the corner of the lounge and quietly drank his But note that there are some other uses for the simple past tense, for example in conditional or if sentences.

We use it to say what we were in the middle of doing at a particular moment in the past. In this lesson we look at the structure and the use of the past continuous tense, followed by a quiz to check your understanding: How do we make the Past Continuous Tense?

For question sentences, we exchange the subject and auxiliary verb. Were you being silly? Were they playing football?

English tenses

The spelling rules for adding ing to make the past continuous tense are the same as for the present continuous tense. How do we use the Past Continuous Tense? The action started before that moment but has not finished at that moment.

For example, yesterday I watched a film on TV. The film started at 7pm and finished at 9pm. At 8pm yesterday, I was watching TV. When we use the past continuous tense, our listener usually knows or understands what time we are talking about. We often use the past continuous tense to "set the scene" in stories.

We use it to describe the background situation at the moment when the action begins. Often, the story starts with the past continuous tense and then moves into the simple past tense. Here is an example: " James Bond was driving through town. It was raining. The wind was blowing hard. Nobody was walking in the streets. Suddenly, Bond saw the killer in a telephone box We use the past continuous tense to express a long action. And we use the simple past tense to express a short action that happens in the middle of the long action.

We can join the two ideas with when or while. In the following example, we have two actions: 1. I was watching TV at 8pm. Short action. Notice that "when you telephoned" is also a way of defining the time [8pm]. When the car exploded I was walking past it. The car exploded while I was walking past it. While I was walking past the car it exploded. Notice that the long action and short action are relative. This tense talks about the "past in the past". In this lesson we look at: How do we make the Past Perfect Tense?

Had you arrived? Had they eaten dinner? When speaking with the past perfect tense, we often contract the subject and auxiliary verb: I had I'd you had you'd Page 24 of 38 PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version www. How do we use the Past Perfect Tense? The past perfect tense expresses action in the past before another action in the past.

This is the past in the past. We arrived at 9. When we arrived, the train had left. The train had left when we arrived.

We arrive in past at 9. I had just eaten. They had not eaten for five hours. I had never seen him before. Where had she gone? The train has left.

The train had left. For question sentences, we exchange the subject and first auxiliary verb.

Had you been drinking? Had they been waiting long? When speaking with the past perfect continuous tense, we often contract the subject and first auxiliary verb: I had been I'd been you had been you'd been he had he'd been she had been she'd been Page 27 of 38 PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version www.

The past perfect continuous tense is like the past perfect tense, but it expresses longer actions in the past before another action in the past. I arrived at 11am. When I arrived, Ram had been waiting for two hours. Ram had been waiting for two hours when I arrived. He had been running. Somebody had been smoking. I was not surprised. It had not been running well for a long time. You can sometimes think of the past perfect continuous tense like the present perfect continuous tense, but instead of the time being now the time is past.

I have been waiting for two hours. He had been waiting for two hours. How do we make the Simple Future Tense? Will you arrive on time? Will they want dinner? When we use the simple future tense in speaking, we often contract the subject and auxiliary verb: I will I'll you will you'll Page 30 of 38 PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version www. No Plan We use the simple future tense when there is no plan or decision to do something before we speak.

We make the decision spontaneously at the time of speaking. I'll get a pen.

In these examples, we had no firm plan before speaking. The decision is made at the time of speaking. Prediction We often use the simple future tense to make a prediction about the future. Again, there is no firm plan. We are saying what we think will happen.

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