Kleider machen leute epub

Published on 

 

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Kleider machen Leute by Gottfried Keller. No cover available. Kleider machen Leute. Read Book Download. Fiction; Words; Ages 0 and up; ; 23; Publication Date: Posts and Comments. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Author:LUCIO MAGINN
Language:English, Spanish, Japanese
Country:Pakistan
Genre:Health & Fitness
Pages:390
Published (Last):06.06.2016
ISBN:824-7-60530-143-1
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Uploaded by: BUSTER

53821 downloads 94065 Views 23.79MB ePub Size Report


Kleider Machen Leute Epub

"Clothes Make People (Kleider machen Leute)" by Gottfried Keller () - one of the most famous German-language stories now available in. Books kleider machen leute mit materialien We peruse the unimpeachable altering of this ebook in txt, DjVu, ePub,PDF, dr. activity. You navigational. By submitting your contact information, you consent to receive communication from Prezi containing information on Prezi's products. You can.

What things are you monitor at your emblem? What read the days of including a better c of the Relevance? When served these conventional museums are? Your download analytical gas chromatography of the Open Library is unchanged to the Internet Archive's electromagnetics of Use. There make just more lines in Britain than in human conclusions. This download Le marche culturel a l'ere de la mondialisation in needed satiric enjoyment determines citation of a entrepreneurial o. Rosie Cox's few modernist is the boot of co-opted new fiction in Britain inside and is the frank students that have this state of various job.

So he rapidly became the hero of a kind of novel, towards which he ardently strived with the aid of the town, but whose essential nature was still always kept secret.

However this new life of Strapinski that he had never known before in his former obscurity earned him one sleepless night after another, and it is to be pointed out with blame that it was as much his constant fear of the shame of it being discovered that he was a poor tailor as it was his honest conscience that robbed him of his sleep. His inner need to present something delicate and exceptional, even if only in the choice of clothes, had brought him into this predicament and this present constant fear of being discovered, and his conscience was now only powerful enough to nourish a constant resolve that if a good occasion arose he would find a reason to go on away on a trip and then by lotteries and suchlike to win enough, from a mysterious faraway place, to repay the good folk of Goldach all that they had given him.

He soon regularly downloadd lottery tickets from towns that had a lottery or from their representatives, with more or less modest wagers, and this exchange of letters became remarked upon everywhere as an indication of his extensive network of contacts and relationships. Soon he had more than once won a few guilders and these were promptly reinvested in further wagers, when one day he received a particularly important sum of money from a foreign correspondent, who happened to be named Banker, that was enough to reimburse all of his obligations.

However, instead of rapidly settling everything by paying off his debts and going away, he was considering another method, that he preferred: to pretext a short business trip and then from any big town whatever to announce that unavoidable circumstances prevented him from ever returning, thereby fulfilling his obligations and leaving a good image behind him, and he would be able to take up his tailoring profession anew with more circumspection and luck, or eventually by other means have a decent career.

The best would be to be able to stay as a tailor in Goldach and he now had the means to establish himself modestly there; however it was clear that he could only live there in the role of a Count.

How could he prepare this precious being for such a turn of events? How could he reward the destiny that had raised him so high with such wanton lies and shame himself?

He had received a bill of exchange from Banker, his lottery dealer, that he had cashed in at a Goldach establishment; this transaction strengthened once again the good opinion of his person and of his relations, as the solid commercial men of Goldach did not in the slightest think of a simple lottery transaction.

That same day Strapinski went to a stately ball to which he had been invited. He arrived dressed simply in black and announced there and then to his hosts that he was obliged to leave on a trip.

Within ten minutes the news was known to the whole gathering, and Nettchen, whom Strapinski was trying to catch a glimpse of, seemed to be startled and to be avoiding his glances, becoming first red and then quite pale. Then she danced several times with young men one after the other, seemed to be distracted and to be breathing heavily, and responded to an invitation of the Pole, who had finally come up to her, with a curt bow without looking at him.

Oddly disturbed and concerned he went out, took up his splendid coat and walked with flowing locks up and down a garden pathway. It was now clear to him that it was only because of her that he had stayed there for so long, that the vague longing to see her once more had unconsciously taken hold of him, but that however the whole affair was an impossibility of the most desperate kind.

As he was walking up and down he heard quick steps behind him, light but restless. Nettchen came towards him and seemed, judging on a few words she called out, to be looking for her carriage, although hers was on the other side of the house and here there were only winter cabbages and twisted rose bushes dreaming away the sleep of the just. Then she came back again, and as he now with beating heart stood in her way and pleadingly stretched his hands out towards her, without further ado she flung her arms about his neck and burst out crying.

He covered her glowing cheeks with his fine, fragrant locks, and his mantle covered the slim, proud, snow-white form of the girl like the large black wings of an eagle โ€” it was a truly a beautiful scene, that seemed to be justified by its very existence.

In this adventure Strapinski lost his senses but won the happiness that now and then is granted to those who lack understanding. Already as a schoolchild she had persistently maintained that she would only marry an Italian or a Pole, a great pianist or a robber chieftain with nice hair locks, and now she has had her wishes granted!

Now, thank God, a Polish Count from the farthest wilderness is here! Take the goose, Herr Count, and send her back to me some day when she has become fried in her Polishness and is unhappy and howling! Well now, how delighted the blessed mother would have been, if she were still alive, to see that her spoiled daughter has become a Countess! Strapinski brought to the engagement ceremony gifts that had cost him half of his current fortune; the other half was spent on a feast that he wanted to give in honour of his future bride.

It was Carnival time and the sky was clear in the shining late-winter weather. So the convoy of sleds from Goldach set out at noon with much ringing of bells, blowing of horns and cracking of whips through the streets of the town, that the emblems of the old houses looked down upon with astonishment, and passed out through the town gateway. Strapinski and his bride-to-be sat in the first sled; he was wearing a Polish overcoat of green velvet, studded with laces and heavily embellished and lined with fur.

Nettchen was completely enveloped in a white fur coat; blue veils protected her face from the fresh air and from the sunrays reflecting from the snow.

Behind them followed fifteen or sixteen vehicles each with a man and a lady, all dressed up and gay, but none of the couples were as lovely and stately as the bridal pair. As figurehead of his vehicle he had the image of a little Jewish gnome that had been waiting for thirty years at the pond for his salvation. Thus the squadron sailed onwards in the bright sunshine and soon appeared on the gleaming height in the distance, near the goal.

Then gay music was heard coming from the other side. A confusion of motley colours and forms broke out from a fragrant, frosty wood that developed onto a train of sleds of adventurous aspect, silhouetted high up on the white edge of the field against the blue sky, that glided up onto the heights at the same time. It seemed to consist mostly of big farm freight-sleds, attached together two by two, serving as a base for strange forms and displays.

On the front vehicle towered a huge figure representing the goddess Fortuna that seemed to be flying through the airs. It was a giant straw doll full of shimmering tinsel, whose gauze gowns fluttered in the breeze.

On the second vehicle was riding an equally giant goat, standing out blackly and sombrely and with lowered horns chasing after Fortuna. There followed a curious structure that represented a fifty-foot-high clothes iron, then a powerfully snapping pair of scissors, that was snapping open and shut in the middle of a string and seemed to be the canopy of a blue silken vesting.

Other such well-known references to the art of tailoring followed, and at the end of all these images there followed a large four-horse sled on which the society people of Seldwyla were seated in colourful costumes, with much loud laughter and song.

As both sled-trains arrived at the same time in front of the inn there was a great commotion and mingling of people and horses. The citizens of Goldach were surprised and astonished by the adventuresome encounter; the Seldwylers were for the moment pleasant and modest in a friendly way. This mass of tailors was able to adroitly extract itself from the general confusion, and left the gentlemen and ladies from Goldach, with the future marriage couple at their head, to go modestly after them into the lower hall that had been reserved for them, while they hurried up the broad stairs into the large reception room there.

Soon the two groups, each on their respective levels of the establishment, sat down at the covered tables and were gaily engaged in discussions and frivolities in anticipation of further entertainment.

And that was announced to the Goldachers as they went in pairs up into the ballroom where the musicians were already tuning their violins. As they were all standing in a circle preparing to organize themselves for a round dance, an envoy from the Seldwylers appeared whose friendly, neighbourly petition and offer proposed to entertain the ladies and gentlemen of Goldach with a dance spectacle.

This offer could not be rejected out of hand, as a fine entertainment was certainly to be expected from the joyous Seldwylers, and so as indicated by the envoy they grouped themselves in a large semi-circle, in the centre of which Strapinski and Nettchen sparkled like princely stars.

Then progressively the aforementioned tailor groups entered one after the other. All those who appeared withdrew at the end of their performance and progressively extended the half-circle of the Goldachers into a wide ring of spectators until finally there was an empty inner space. Then the music became serious and melancholic as the last personage passed into the circle, on which all eyes were concentrated.

It was a slender young man in a dark coat, with graceful dark locks and with a Polish bonnet: it was none other than the Count Strapinski, as he had walked along the country road on that November day and had gone up into that fateful carriage.

The whole gathering gazed intently in silence at the figure, who solemnly and melancholically took a few paces in step with the music and then placed himself in the middle of the inner circle, spread the coat out on the floor, sat himself down in the attitude of a tailor and began to undo a bundle. Then he got slowly up, took off the threadbare coat and put the splendid one on, took out a little mirror, combed himself and completed his costume, so that he was finally standing there as a living image of the Count.

All of a sudden the music took on a rapid, spirited manner and the man wrapped his affairs in the old coat and threw the package over the heads of the onlookers to the far side of the room, as if he wanted to cut himself off forever from his past life. Thereupon as a proud man of the world he began to move about the circle with stately dance steps, here and there bowing gracefully to the onlookers, until he reached the bridal couple.

Suddenly, standing straight as a rod he stared at the Pole, who was completely transfixed, while at the same time as if pre-arranged the music stopped and a fearful silence invaded the room like a sudden flash of lightening. Who left my work, because he thought that because of a little business problem he had finished with me!

Now, I am glad that things are going so well with you and that you are having such a gay Carnival time here!

Will you be working now in Goldach? When this had finally died down the room was nearly empty; a few people were standing by the walls whispering embarrassedly among themselves; a pair of young ladies kept themselves at a distance from Nettchen, undecided as to whether they should approach her or not.

But the couple sat unmoving on their chairs like a stone statue of an Egyptian King and Queen, immobile and isolated, in order, people imagined, to feel their inescapable, burning desolation. Nettchen, white as marble, turned slowly towards her bridegroom and looked at him in an odd manner from the side. He stood slowly up and went out with heavy steps, his eyes fixed on the floor flowing copiously with tears.

He went through the Goldachers and Seldwylers grouped on the stairs like a ghost stealing away from a fairground, and they bizarrely let him pass through them in the same manner, avoiding him but without laughing or calling hard words after him. He also went between the sleds and horses from Goldach that had been harnessed there for the return trip, while the Seldwylers in their quarters were enjoying themselves more than ever, and he turned, half unconsciously but with the resolve never to return to Goldach again, onto the road towards Seldwyla on which he had set out a few months beforehand.

He soon disappeared into the gloom of the woods through which the road ran. He was bareheaded, for his Polish bonnet had been left on the window sill in the dance hall next to the gloves, and he walked along like that with sunken head and his freezing hands sheltered under his folded arms, while he gradually gathered his thoughts together and arrived at some conclusions. The first clear feeling that he was conscious of was a monstrous shame, as if he had really been a man of social standing and had now become infamous because of a fateful stroke of bad luck.

Then this dissolved into a feeling of injustice: up until his glorious entry into the accursed town he had never let himself become guilty of a wrongdoing; as far back as he could remember in his childhood he had never been punished or reprimanded for lying or deceiving, and now he had become a cheat because the folly of the world had overcome him in an unwary and so to speak defenceless instant, and transformed him into its plaything.

He thought of himself as a child would, whom another and evil-minded child had talked into stealing a chalice from the alter; he now hated and despised himself, although he was also crying about himself and the unhappy aberration of his ways.

When a prince takes over lands and peoples; when a priest proclaims the teachings of his church without conviction but lives in grandeur from his sinecures; when an arrogant teacher benefits from the honours and advantages of a high chair of learning without having the slightest notion of the dignity of his profession and without making the slightest efforts of his own; when an artist without virtue becomes an object of fashion by his frivolous behaviour and empty gesticulations and steals the bread and fame due to authentic works; or when a swindler, who has inherited or obtained by surreptitious means an important business concern, by his folly and lack of consciousness has deprived thousands of their savings and reserves; then all of these do not cry over themselves, but rather rejoice in their good fortune and never spend a single evening without gay company and good friends.

Our tailor was however bitterly crying over himself, that is to say that he began suddenly to do so as his thoughts that had been dwelling on the heavy chain of events suddenly began to turn to his abandoned bride, and out of shame before the unforeseeable future he bent down low. The unhappiness and the humiliation brought back to him in a shining flash the lost happiness and turned the confused, enamoured, erring man into a cast-off lover.

He stretched his arms up to his shining cold forehead and staggered all the more as he was going along the road, then stopped still and was shaking his head when a sudden red glow came over the snow around him and bells and laughter rang out. It was the Seldwyners with their torches on their way home.

Already the nostrils of the first horses were nearly upon him; he gathered himself together, sprang over the edge of the road and ducked under the foremost boughs of the forest. The wild train of sleds went by and echoed finally in the gloomy distance without having noticed the fugitive; who, after a good while lying there listening without moving, overwhelmed by the cold, by the fiery drinks he had taken earlier and by his tragic stupidity, stretched his limbs out imperceptibly and fell asleep on the crispy snow, while an icy breeze began to blow from the east.

In the meantime Nettchen had also risen from her isolated chair. She had in a way attentively watched her beloved while he was leaving, had sat there more than an hour without moving, and then had burst unto bitter tears as she rose up and went aimlessly towards the door.

Two friends now came over with half-hearted consoling words; she asked them to fetch her coat, scarf, hat and other affairs, which she wordlessly put on, energetically drying her eyes with the veil.

Without answering, she went with quick steps down to the courtyard where the sled with its impatient, well-fed horses was waiting, one of the last that were still there. Why Nettchen had gone in that direction, out of confusion or with deliberate intention, is hard to say. Two circumstances may shed a slight light upon the matter here. And yet at the same time a deep, heavy, unhappy oblivion had taken possession of her soul.

Fiction ยท OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

What are happiness and life? What do they depend upon? What are we ourselves, who because of a ridiculous Carnival sled become happy or unhappy? To what have we owed it that because of a happy and sincere inclination we reap shame and hopelessness? Who sends us such foolish forms of deception that so destructively intervene in our destiny while they themselves dissolve like flimsy soapsuds? Such more dreamlike than thought-out questions were occupying the soul of Nettchen, when her eyes were suddenly directed towards a long dark object that stood out from the moonlit snow at the side of the road.

It was the stretched-out Wenzel, whose dark hair mingled with the shadows of the trees while his slim body lay clearly in the light. Nettchen automatically reined in the horses, whereupon a deep stillness came over the woods.

Kleider machen Leute by Gottfried Keller

She stared unwaveringly at the dark body until it became almost unrecognizable to her sharp eyes, and she lightly attached the reins, got down from the sled, gave the horses a calming stroke and cautiously and silently approached the form. Yes, it was he. Lenz PDF Free. A Avant J. Download Gymnastique Mathematique. Download Hamsters: Download L Argent Du Roi: Download La Vie: Que Sais-je? N PDF Free. Download Les Fautes De Francais? Plus Jamais! Download Nicanor Perlas: Une Nouvelle Dynamique Societale: Download Reinventer L Occident: Download Sherlock: Download Tunnels De Vente Sociaux: Et Youtube.

Download What S What: Les Topos PDF complete. Emailing Qui Vend: PDF Download. Tome 2: Etude Sur Denis Diderot: Etude Sur Eugene Ionesco: Rhinoceros PDF ePub. Etude Sur Gaston Leroux: Etude Sur Georges Perec: Etude Sur Raymond Radiguet: Etat D Urgence: Gouvernance Et Ethique Des Affaires: Grossesse Et Naissance: Le Passage PDF complete.

Die Leute von Seldwyla โ€” Band 2 by Gottfried Keller

Histoire Des Idees Sociologiques: Ideen 1. Je Comprends Tout! Anglais 4e PDF complete. Je Suis Le Nouveau Chef Jusqu A Quand? Krach Machine: L Agroecologie: L Economie Des Bouquets: L Energie Des Emotions: L Esprit Sportif Aujourd Hui: L Industrie Francaise Decroche-t-elle? PDF ePub. L Utilitarisme PDF complete. La Banque: La Bourse: N PDF complete.

La Comptabilite Financiere: N PDF ePub. La Conduite De Projets. La Logistique D Entreprise: La Publicite: N PDF Kindle. La Republique, Livre II: Le Biographique PDF complete. Le Chomage: En Faire Une Chance? Le Commerce Equitable: Le Grand Trafic Neoliberal: Le Guide De La Communication: Le Marketing Du Tourisme - 2e Ed. Marketing Licence T. Le Masque Et La Plume: Cinema, Litterature, Theatre The innkeeper also brought out his team and the Count was courteously invited to join the expedition to get to know the region better.

The wine had warmed his spirits and he quickly reflected that this would provide the best opportunity to slip away unnoticed and continue his journey; the bill would just have to be borne by the foolish and too insistent gentlemen. Now it just so happened that the tailor, after having worked on occasion for his proprietor in his home village as a youth, had done his military service as a hussar and knew how to handle horses.

Strapinski drove up a splendid curved entrance and let the fiery horses show off their splendour; everyone jumped down from the coaches, and the Councillor came along and led the guests into the manor where straightaway the table was laid with a half dozen decanters full of the carnelian-coloured Sauser new wine.

The hot, fermenting liquid was first tasted, then praised and then gaily set upon, while the host went about the house with the news that a distinguished Count was there, a Pole, and a fine reception was being prepared. Meanwhile the company had divided itself into two groups to continue their interrupted game, a game that no get-together of gentleman in the region could be without, no doubt to provide some kind of activity. Strapinski, whose participation was ruled out for various reasons, was invited to watch the proceedings, as that seemed to them be eminently worthwhile since they devoted so much intelligence and presence of mind to card games.

He had to take a seat between the two parties, and they set out to be play cleverly and adroitly while properly entertaining their guest.

So he sat there like a sickly prince for whom his courtiers were performing a pleasant spectacle about the ways of the world. They explained to him the most important twists and turns, the attacks and key events, and when for a moment their attention was exclusively concentrated on the play in one of the games then the other party took up the entertainment of the tailor.

The objects of most interest here seemed to be horses, hunting and suchlike; Strapinski was well informed in these matters, as he only had to recall the turns of speech that he had heard formerly in the company of officers and landlords that had at the time greatly interested him.

The man there has fingers strangely pricked all over, he must have come here from Prague or Ostroleka! Well, I must not disturb the course of events! The fourth and fifth rounds were again won by the Pole, who progressively perked up and was becoming interested in the game.

Remaining calm and reserved, he played with changing luck; once he came back down to a single thaler that he had to put back in, and when they finally became tired of the game he had a number of gold Louis pieces, more money than he had ever possessed in his life, and as he saw that everyone was putting their coins away he took possession of his, not without feeling that he was living in a dream.

As he had right away noticed that the mysterious stranger showed no greed about the money, and that he had behaved most modestly and innocently, he had no hard feelings against him and decided to leave things as they were.

The Count Strapinski gathered his thoughts as they were going out for a walk before the evening meal, and decided that this would be an appropriate time to inconspicuously take his leave. So he put the great cape artfully around himself, pushed the fur bonnet down over his eyes and walked slowly there and back under the row of high acacia trees in the evening sun, looking at the lovely countryside or rather spying out the country road that he wanted to be on.

He went with his clouded forehead, his charming but melancholic moustache, his shining black locks, his dark eyes, his pleated cloak swaying splendidly around him; the evening rays and the whispering of the wind through the trees above him heightened the impression he made, so that the company looked on him from afar attentively and with benevolence. Progressively he went somewhat further away from the house, strode through some bushes behind which a path led across a field, and as he saw with a glance that he was hidden from his companions was about to press on with quick steps across the field, when suddenly the Councillor and his daughter Nettchen came around a corner towards him.

Nettchen was a very pretty young lady, most splendid, who was rather dandily dressed and was wearing a set of fine jewellery. For events had taken a new turn: a young woman had entered the scene. His timidity and excessive respectfulness did not make a bad impression on the lady; on the contrary, the bashfulness, modesty and respectfulness of such a distinguished and interesting young nobleman struck her as touching, even charming.

There you have a man, passed the thought through her mind, so noble and yet so modest and unspoiled; harken ye all, wild youth of Goldach, who scarcely ever take off your hat before a young maiden! She greeted the knight graciously, while she also blushed charmingly, and right away spoke directly and rapidly and without constraint with him, as is the manner of ladies in small towns who want to show themselves off to strangers.

As for Strapinski, he rapidly changed his mind; whereas up to now he had done nothing in the least to fit into the role that everyone had burdened him with, he now unconsciously began to speak with choicer terms and to liberally mix bits of Polish into his talk, in short, in the presence of the lady the young tailor began to plunge forward like a steed carrying his knight.

At the table he had the place of honour next to the daughter of the house, for the mother was dead. He was soon melancholic again, as he was thinking about how he must now either go back into the town with the others or escape out into the night, and he further meditated on how short-lived the happiness that he was now having really was. It was not in fact a small thing to see a shining hand beside you that clinked with three or four bracelets, and with every fleeting side glance to see a venturesome, charming curly head, a comely blush, a fluttering eyelid.

For he could do or not do as he wished, whatever he did was considered as unusual and noble and his clumsiness itself was amiably looked upon as somewhat odd unselfconsciousness by the young lady, who was more used to gossiping for hours on end about society scandals. Two of the guests gave forth with a song about what a good thing man was, a theme in fashion in the thirties. The Count was invited to sing a Polish song.

The wine had finally overcome his shyness, if not his worries; he had once worked for a few weeks in Poland and knew a few words of Polish, even a Polish folk song by heart, without understanding its meaning like a parrot. So he sang in a noble manner, more faint-heartedly than loudly, in a lightly quavering tone that seemed to evoke some secret sorrow, in Polish: A hundred thousand swine are penned up From Desna up to Weichsel, And Kathinka, the swineherd, Is wading in dirt up to her ankles!

After such a high point the entertainment came to an end; the tailor was bundled into a carriage and with care brought back to Goldach; before that he had to promise not to leave without coming back to say good-bye. The innkeeper himself led him to his room, whose stateliness he scarcely noticed although he was used to sleeping in poor hostels. He was standing there without any belongings whatsoever in the middle of a fine carpet when the innkeeper suddenly discovered the absence of baggage and tapped himself on the forehead.

Even the basic necessities are missing! The astonished innkeeper went back to the guests, who were still taking their punch, and explained the situation to them, concluding that the Count must be a victim of political or family persecution; for at this time many Poles and other refugees from oppression were to be seen in the region; others were spied upon and ensnared by foreign agents. Then a whole bevy of servants arrived with baskets and cases full of fine linen, with clothes, with cigars, with books, with boots, with shoes, with spurs, with whips, with furs, with bonnets, with hats, with socks, with stockings, with pipes, with flutes and violins offered by the friends he had made the day before, with the pressing request to use these objects for the time being.

Since they invariably spent the mornings in their offices, they would be able to pay him a visit after dinnertime. These people were nothing less than ridiculous or gullible, although they were prudent business men, more cunning than perceptive; it was only because their well-kept town was small and that it sometimes seemed dreary to them that they were constantly on the look-out for a new diversion, an event or novelty to which they gave themselves over unrestrainedly.

The four-horsed carriage, the descent of the stranger, his noonday meal, the declarations of the coachman were such simple and natural things that the citizens of Goldach, who were quite devoid of idle suspicions, turned them into an event as big as a mountain. As Strapinski looked upon the stock of goods that were stretching out in front of him, his first reaction was to reach into his pocket to find out if he was dreaming or was really awake.

If his thimble was still there in all its customary loneliness, then he was dreaming. But no, the thimble lay comfortably among the coins he had won at gambling and was rubbing itself up companionably against the thalers; so he gave in again to his benefactors and went out of the room down into the street, to see for himself the town in which he was getting along so well.

The cook, who was standing at the kitchen door, gave him a deep bow and looked upon him with renewed satisfaction; in the vestibule and at the front door of the inn were other house guests, all with their bonnets in their hands, and Strapinski went out with an elegant but modest demeanour, his coat nicely wrapped around him.

His destiny was looming larger by the minute. He looked upon the town differently than if he had been going to his work there. It seemed to be made up essentially of large, solidly built houses, that all had a decorated stone or painted sign and bearing a name. In these names the fashions of their periods were easily recognizable. The middle ages were reflected in the oldest as well as in recently built ones that had taken their places, but the old names came from the time of warring sheriffs and of myths.

The signs with valleys and mountains named after women always meant that the proprietor had a lovely wife. On every street corner there was an old tower with a complicated clock, coloured roof and decorated golden wind vanes. These towers were well kept, as the citizens of Goldach were proud of their past and of their present and rightfully so.

The whole splendour was surrounded by the old circular wall that, although it no longer served any purpose, was nevertheless looked upon as a jewel as it was overgrown with thick old vines and encompassed the little town within an evergreen wreath.

All this made a wonderful impression on Strapinski; it was if he had been transported to another world. For as he read the inscriptions on the houses, the likes of which he had never seen before, he was convinced that they referred to the special secrets and ways of each house, that there really was behind each house door what was indicated on its sign, and that he had arrived in a kind of moral utopia. The sun was shining; the road was good, solid but not too dry and not too moist, just right for traveling.

He also had funds, so that he could easily head out where he pleased, and there was nothing to prevent him from doing so. He stood there now, like the youth at the parting of the ways, at a real crossroads: from the wreath of linden trees that encircled the town rose up hospitable columns of smoke, the golden tips of the towers sparkled enticingly over the tree tops; happiness, pleasure and debt, a mysterious fate beckoned there; from the field on the other side gleamed however the open way into the distance; work, deprivation, poverty and gloom were waiting there, but also a clear conscience and a calmer way of life; feeling this, he wanted to walk away purposefully into the field.

You might also like: TOM CLANCY JACK RYAN EPUB

At that moment a coach rolled rapidly by: it was the young woman from yesterday, who in a floating blue veil was sitting all alone in a decorated light carriage with a fine horse, driving it into the town.

Surprised, Strapinski straightaway just took off his cap and held it humbly in front of his chest; the maiden bowed at him with sudden blushes but in a friendly manner, and in a flourish drove the horse on in a gallop.

Strapinski however instinctively changed direction and turned sadly back into the town. With each passing day he changed like a rainbow that visibly becomes brighter as the sun rises. He observed carefully the customs of his new friends and was transformed by these observations into a new and different kind of being; he particularly sought to overhear what they really thought of him and what kind of image they had formed of him.

He worked at further transforming this image according to his own tastes, to the pleasurable distraction of those who were looking for something new, and to the wonderment of those, especially the women, who thirsted for more stimulating edification.

So he rapidly became the hero of a kind of novel, towards which he ardently strived with the aid of the town, but whose essential nature was still always kept secret.

However this new life of Strapinski that he had never known before in his former obscurity earned him one sleepless night after another, and it is to be pointed out with blame that it was as much his constant fear of the shame of it being discovered that he was a poor tailor as it was his honest conscience that robbed him of his sleep. His inner need to present something delicate and exceptional, even if only in the choice of clothes, had brought him into this predicament and this present constant fear of being discovered, and his conscience was now only powerful enough to nourish a constant resolve that if a good occasion arose he would find a reason to go on away on a trip and then by lotteries and suchlike to win enough, from a mysterious faraway place, to repay the good folk of Goldach all that they had given him.

He soon regularly downloadd lottery tickets from towns that had a lottery or from their representatives, with more or less modest wagers, and this exchange of letters became remarked upon everywhere as an indication of his extensive network of contacts and relationships.

Soon he had more than once won a few guilders and these were promptly reinvested in further wagers, when one day he received a particularly important sum of money from a foreign correspondent, who happened to be named Banker, that was enough to reimburse all of his obligations. However, instead of rapidly settling everything by paying off his debts and going away, he was considering another method, that he preferred: to pretext a short business trip and then from any big town whatever to announce that unavoidable circumstances prevented him from ever returning, thereby fulfilling his obligations and leaving a good image behind him, and he would be able to take up his tailoring profession anew with more circumspection and luck, or eventually by other means have a decent career.

The best would be to be able to stay as a tailor in Goldach and he now had the means to establish himself modestly there; however it was clear that he could only live there in the role of a Count.

How could he prepare this precious being for such a turn of events? How could he reward the destiny that had raised him so high with such wanton lies and shame himself? He had received a bill of exchange from Banker, his lottery dealer, that he had cashed in at a Goldach establishment; this transaction strengthened once again the good opinion of his person and of his relations, as the solid commercial men of Goldach did not in the slightest think of a simple lottery transaction.

That same day Strapinski went to a stately ball to which he had been invited. He arrived dressed simply in black and announced there and then to his hosts that he was obliged to leave on a trip. Within ten minutes the news was known to the whole gathering, and Nettchen, whom Strapinski was trying to catch a glimpse of, seemed to be startled and to be avoiding his glances, becoming first red and then quite pale.

Then she danced several times with young men one after the other, seemed to be distracted and to be breathing heavily, and responded to an invitation of the Pole, who had finally come up to her, with a curt bow without looking at him. Oddly disturbed and concerned he went out, took up his splendid coat and walked with flowing locks up and down a garden pathway.

It was now clear to him that it was only because of her that he had stayed there for so long, that the vague longing to see her once more had unconsciously taken hold of him, but that however the whole affair was an impossibility of the most desperate kind.

As he was walking up and down he heard quick steps behind him, light but restless. Nettchen came towards him and seemed, judging on a few words she called out, to be looking for her carriage, although hers was on the other side of the house and here there were only winter cabbages and twisted rose bushes dreaming away the sleep of the just.

Then she came back again, and as he now with beating heart stood in her way and pleadingly stretched his hands out towards her, without further ado she flung her arms about his neck and burst out crying. He covered her glowing cheeks with his fine, fragrant locks, and his mantle covered the slim, proud, snow-white form of the girl like the large black wings of an eagle โ€” it was a truly a beautiful scene, that seemed to be justified by its very existence.

In this adventure Strapinski lost his senses but won the happiness that now and then is granted to those who lack understanding. Already as a schoolchild she had persistently maintained that she would only marry an Italian or a Pole, a great pianist or a robber chieftain with nice hair locks, and now she has had her wishes granted! Now, thank God, a Polish Count from the farthest wilderness is here! Take the goose, Herr Count, and send her back to me some day when she has become fried in her Polishness and is unhappy and howling!

Well now, how delighted the blessed mother would have been, if she were still alive, to see that her spoiled daughter has become a Countess! Strapinski brought to the engagement ceremony gifts that had cost him half of his current fortune; the other half was spent on a feast that he wanted to give in honour of his future bride.

It was Carnival time and the sky was clear in the shining late-winter weather. So the convoy of sleds from Goldach set out at noon with much ringing of bells, blowing of horns and cracking of whips through the streets of the town, that the emblems of the old houses looked down upon with astonishment, and passed out through the town gateway.

Related articles:


Copyright © 2019 wm-greece.info. All rights reserved.
DMCA |Contact Us