Editorial Reviews. wm-greece.info Review. A Behind-the-Scenes Look at The Dog Project How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain - Kindle edition by Gregory Berns. Download it once and read it on . PDF - How Dogs Love Us. The powerful bond between humans and dogs is one that's uniquely cherished. Loyal, obedient, and affectionate, they are truly. Download [PDF] How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain Ebook | READ ONLINE For download.

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Read How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain PDF Ebook by Gregory Berns. site Publishing. Simple Way to Read Online How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain by Gregory Berns Book or Download in PDF. Neuroscientist Gregory Berns had spent decades using MRI imaging technology to study how the human brain works, but a different question still nagged at him.

In answering his original question, he sparks many more about how we value and care for our canine companions. Gregory Berns's account of his lab's Dog Project provides readers with new insights into the minds of our most loyal companions while also reminding us that scientific research should be approached with passion, love, and a bold disregard for the possibility of failure. Berns offers hilarious descriptions of training his dog to lie still while being fed hot dogs in the MRI brain-scan machine. Berns's tale is a dramatic but very funny look at how real, grubby science can accomplish great things. This is dognitive science at its insightful, passionate, and playful best. In How Dogs Love Us, Gregory Berns gives us our first real look inside the brain of a dog, while simultaneously setting new standards in ethical science.

The reader feels as though they themselves are part of the team, working through problems that arise, and so we too become exultant when success is achieved. I was not observing from a distance; I was involved and I cared and their progress and their failures were felt as my own. Scientific terms are explained clearly and simply.

This is important because you must understand the science to feel you are part of the scientific team. I find that those who best know their field can explain simply, and that is what the author does here. We meet the author's past and present dogs and his family.

The death of his pug led him to start the Dog Project.

PDF - How Dogs Love Us

One of his dogs, Callie, a mixed breed feist from a shelter, was one of the two dogs in the project. The other dog in the project, McKenzie, was a trained border collie. She view spoiler [dies. In meeting the whole family, the book touches on how science should be taught in schools and the emotional impact our dogs have on our lives.

How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain

The Dog Project was "open in form", meaning the scientists did NOT start with a particular hypothesis to be tested. They simply wanted to see what the MRI scans of a canine brain would reveal. Originally, I was surprised to see that the dogs were equally happy to be rewarded by a hot dog slice or a just a measly pea! Then I realized that this is exactly what dog trainers tell us; do not reward every accomplished task with a treat.

It is the reward the dog is after. What really puts dogs in attention mode is when they are sometimes given a hot dog slice and sometimes NOT rewarded at all.

What the dog is looking for is praise from his owner. Think about that! Having confirmed on MRI scans guidelines that we dog owners have been following for years in the training of our pets is satisfying. Dog training is best accomplished through hand signals, clear and consistent commands and positive rewards. Again, another topic the book successfully explores - dog training. The MRI scans seem to show that our dogs reciprocate the love we feel for them, that they intuit our thoughts and that they have the ability to maintain inter-species social cognition.

If further experiments reconfirm what the Dog Project has indicated, then our treatment of dogs and many other species must be re-examined.

(PDF Download) How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain

The domestication of dogs too! Finally, I must admit that dogs more than other species have a special place in my heart, and when a book successfully explores this bond, such a book will be exceptional to me.

Try these: View all 13 comments. Apr 19, Chris rated it it was ok Shelves: I love reading about dog behavior and dog psychology, so I found it disappointing that only about 30 pages towards the end of this book actually dealt with the study results, and the other are overly detailed accounts of setting up the study, training the dogs, and random family anecdotes.

View 2 comments. Sep 06, Victoria rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a downright fascinating book! A few months ago, a friend passed on an article from The New York Times on this study, but this firsthand account of the Dog Project at Emory University is obviously a much more in-depth and thorough look at getting a functional MRI to help decode the inner workings of the canine mind. Berns perfectly balances the science with his own experiences, love of dogs and even his family life as his whole team works towards their goals.

It is surprisingly fast-pac This is a downright fascinating book! It is surprisingly fast-paced and an absolute joy to read. It truly is a wonderful book - both informative and moving.

What makes this all the more exciting is that this is one of the only dogs books that I have read in a while that truly presents new and exciting information. The research and the science feels new and quite fresh. This book certainly makes his talents as a scientist, author, parent and dog owner quite apparent! I will definitely be keeping an eye out for a follow-up! Dec 15, Richard rated it it was ok. The results of the research are very interesting, but they can be summed up in two sentences.

This book pads those results with a rather poorly told story. I wish I had googled for the study results and spent the time saved reading a book that was actually good. Positive reinforcement is a shortcut to train dogs, but it is not necessarily the best way to form a relationship with them.

I very much appreciate the exceptional humane objectives and treatment, but I admit I skimmed a large chunk of the beginning of this book in order to get to what I was truly interested in - the findings and what they feel they'd learned. It was all quite interesting to me. As a dog person myself I have no doubt our dogs do love us. But of course, they are still a different species and it's wise not to think of them as mini-humans, at least as far as things like how they think, what they feel, and physical needs.

Dog people know that relationships with dogs can certainly be mutually beneficial, and have an inter-dependancy, even on a purely emotional level, that rivals what humans can experience in relationships with other humans. But how is that relationship from a dog's perspective? Do they feel love, affection, or do they see their human companions as simply dispensers of food and pleasurable things like play time and belly rubs?

I know what I think: D Dogs are social creatures, and clearly able to bond with humans.

They show clear signs of fear, anger, anxiety, joy, even grief. I see no valid reason to deny they also feel affection. Highly recommend to dog lovers who are interested in the dog mind. Some quotes from my highlights: Moreover, these interspecies social skills evolved from dogs' predatory past.

Apart from humans, strong evidence for theory of mind has been found only in monkeys and apes, which have social cognition for primates but not necessarily other animals. Dogs are much better than apes at interspecies social cognition.

How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain by Gregory Berns

More than intuiting what we think, dogs may also feel what we feel. Dogs have emotional intelligence. In the interest of transparency, I need to reveal that I'm a "dog person". I grew up with all sorts of dogs: So going in, I was probably going to like this book.

A lot. All that aside, this was an incredibly interesting book.

The science and research is something that I would probably enjoy immensely, and the author did an outstanding job of keeping it in layman's terms and understandable for the "regular In the interest of transparency, I need to reveal that I'm a "dog person".

The science and research is something that I would probably enjoy immensely, and the author did an outstanding job of keeping it in layman's terms and understandable for the "regular" reader, at least for the most part. The account itself was wonderful, too, with laugh-out-loud moments and an entire chapter of tears late in the book. This book does make me wonder, though, why we need science to figure out that our dogs love us the scientist-author mentioned this, too. We trained them and they trained us , and we were actually pretty successful in this endeavor, actually winning "best-in-state" once with one of them.

Just like in the book, we used all sorts of hand signals to direct the dogs to perform various tasks and actions, and rewarded them on an infrequent basis, especially when in the ring. The dog my wife and I have now, a 9-year old Chihuahua named "Fantum", is very smart, very empathic, and very perceptive.

He knows when we are hurting or need his attention, even to the point of not responding when my wife "fake-cries" just to get a reaction out of him. He knows when my wife's blood pressure or blood glucose is too high, and won't leave her alone until we take care of it. He directs us with his eyes when he wants something: His memory of his "people" is quite impressive, too. My son, Tony, moved out of the house four years ago, and Fantum still looks for him when we say "Tony", running to the front window to look at the driveway for his car.

As cool and as ground-breaking it is, I don't need a brain scan on my dog to know that he loves his family unconditionally. Highly recommended for all "dog people"! Feb 10, Lea rated it liked it Shelves: Although I'm a fan of authors who weave their personal lives into their books -- Mary Roach and Jon Ronson are both masters at this -- Gregory Berns rubbed me the wrong way.

He comes across as smug and superior, and to tell the truth, I was just hanging in there to read about his results. Berns was the first to scan a non-sedated dog in an MRI. A good two-thirds of the book focuses on the author's family, 3. A good two-thirds of the book focuses on the author's family, as well as the training for his Dog Project. While the dog training was interesting, I didn't enjoy the rest of the story.

The final third of the book focuses on the MRIs themselves, as well as the results and the team's conclusions. The book shines in this part, and I thought the Berns really hit his stride at that point. But a funny thing happened -- in the last chapter or two the author again returned to discussing his family and the dogs that live with them, and I didn't find it at all irritating.

I think his enthusiasm for his Dog Project resonated with me, and his obvious love for the members of his "pack" was very charming. He just might grow on you. Dec 09, Carrie rated it it was ok. The author takes a fascinating proband, adds the most exciting area of science; research, and becomes so granular with head positioning, you want to rip your own head off by chapter 8. That is where I started skimming.

Written to an audience who appreciates research, but then written to move so slowly, and on a fifth grade reading level, the book demonstrates that you cannot serve two masters. As someone who has worked many years in medical research, I was hoping for more scientific conclusions The author takes a fascinating proband, adds the most exciting area of science; research, and becomes so granular with head positioning, you want to rip your own head off by chapter 8.

As someone who has worked many years in medical research, I was hoping for more scientific conclusions in the end. What I found was generalization and guess-work. I suppose the redeeming value the publisher felt, was this was a unique topic for a book. If you're a big research nerd like me, however, you'll spend most of your time rolling your eyes, and searching for concrete scientific value to this work.

Oct 23, Janel rated it it was amazing. I just received this book in the mail yesterday afternoon. I started reading it in the evening and was up until midnight when I finally forced myself to put it down.

I finished it this afternoon and I really enjoyed it. Everything from how he came up with the idea to how they trained the dogs to go into the MRI and hold still so they could get images from them while they were awake.

These tests could enable us to say yes that is what the dogs think, since they can not answer questions. I would r I just received this book in the mail yesterday afternoon. I would recommend this book to everyone, it is interesting, well written so it is easy and quick to read and enjoyable.

I can not describe the book well enough so you will just need to read it. Oct 07, Orsolya rated it liked it Shelves: The truth is: On the other hand, this thorough step-by-step detailing of a single experiment invigorates the reader into seeing how experiments are contrived and what goes on behind closed doors.

Noticeably, Berns sometimes repeats himself albeit in a minor way — meaning not with a large chunk of text — and therefore it is modestly detrimental to the text. This is when Berns is more scientific instead of merely penning a memoir but even then he over-simplifies the material and glosses over many details. Berns has traveled on an unprecedented journey of scanning non-sedated dogs but sadly, failed to truly present the amazing, intense merits of this.

Sep 30, Chris Craddock rated it it was amazing Shelves: But first they have to get the dogs to climb into the Magnetic Resonance Imaging contraption, hold their heads perfectly still in spite of the unearthly racket the machine makes, while wearing ear muffs to protect their sensitive ears. While Cally, a Super Feist, will do virtually anything for a chunk of hot dog, eating her succulent bribe causes her head to move.

That is unacceptable, as it blurs the brain scan. How this was accomplished, along with compiling the data and writing a paper that supports their theory, is the gist of How Dogs Love Us. Since this is a non-fiction account, and not a formal scientific paper, there is quite a bit of chatter about the author's feelings about dogs, and the people who love them.

For instance, his dog Cally, who is one of the prime subjects in the experiment, isn't overly affectionate. She doesn't curl up with her head in his armpit at night, but prefers to keep her distance. She is a high energy dog who loves to chase squirrels. She loves food so much that she figured out a way to unlock the plastic food bin, and gorged herself until she was an overstuffed pinata.

But something about her resonated with Gregory Berns. Forget Reservoir Dogs. We're talking Resonate Dogs. Certain dogs "resonate" with certain people, and they bond. Cally reminded me of my dog, Delilah. She is an Australian Cattle Dog, and her herding instinct sometimes causes her to treat people like sheep and herd them hither and yon. But I love her. Gregory Berns spoke of dogs that "resonate" and he was also trying to scan canine brains with Magnetic Resonance Imaging to discover how they resonate with people.

Berns doesn't trust such people. But what about people who are both Dog People and Cat People? Berns doesn't mention them, but I have three dogs and a cat. I think that cats and dogs are different, but they both love people in their own peculiar way.

For instance, a dog on its back wants you to rub his or her belly. But a cat in similar stance could just be waiting in ambush to attack! But I digress.

Cally, and Gregory's other dog, Lyra, were a part of his family. The book also profiles other family members, like his wife and daughter.

His daughter is struggling with science, of all things. At the parent teacher conference Dr. Berns suggests that his daughter's sub par performance may be due to the science teacher's methods and the inadequate text books. I looked at his author photo and concluded that he looked a bit like Paul Lieberstein, who plays HR worker Toby Flenderson. In other segments he mentioned that he was more comfortable with dogs than humans, and I pictured him as Sheldon Cooper, the socially awkward scientist on The Big Bang Theory played by Jim Parsons.

I could picture this whole book as a Sit Com, or more accurately, a dramedy. Not jokes with a laugh track to tell you where to laugh, but more of a subtle dramedy where there are serious and comic moments that arise from real situations. Like maybe Parenthood. Anyway, he tells his daughter that if she studies her science with him for an extra hour a day she can participate when they bring Cally in to be scanned in the Magnetic Resonance Imager.

She can play hooky, but perhaps learn even more by participating in a scientific experiment in a bona fide science laboratory than she would've in school. So, in conclusion, How Dogs Love Us would appeal to those who enjoy science, family sit coms--or dramedies--and dogs. Dog lovers especially will love this book. Jan 28, SheLove2Read rated it it was ok Shelves: This book goes to a lot of trouble to tell us what any dog owner already knows: They only ask for our love and companionship in return.

Aug 21, J L's Bibliomania rated it liked it Shelves: I was not particularly impressed by How Dogs Love Us: While I understand that training an unsedated dog to tolerate and cooperate in the sensory onslaught of an MRI is an achievement, telling the backstory of a single scientific paper involving two dogs did not seem sufficient to warrant an entire book.

I also have issue with the book's title, since the study in question - determining which portion of the dog brain responds to the han I was not particularly impressed by How Dogs Love Us: I also have issue with the book's title, since the study in question - determining which portion of the dog brain responds to the hand signal for a a pleasurable food stimulus as opposed to a null hand signal - seems very far from answering the question "How Dogs Love Us".

Near the end of the book Dr. Bern describes the initial stages of training a larger cohort of 12 dogs for a scent based study. The results of this second study were published in early and are available from www. To truly live with dogs, humans need to become 'great leaders.

There is plenty of discussion of research, which is interesting in parts, funny in others. The thought process that was behind his attempt to prove that dogs are capable of what can only be described as "loving" their "humans. Feb 18, Joe Kessler rated it it was ok.

The science is interesting, but the writing is stilted and the author frequently comes off as arrogant. Plus, as he admits, the fMRI research on dogs really just confirms what pet-owners have known about the social intelligence of these animals for centuries.

It's cool that canine brain activity is being studied, and I appreciate that Berns and his team are going about it so ethically, but this was not an essential read. Dec 26, Derek Arnold rated it it was ok. Loved the idea, but not really what I expected. Out of 25 or so chapters in the book, there are actual dog brain MRI results in only a small handful. More of a story than a presentation of any consequential data. However, the project is ongoing and I'd be interested to read Berns' further work.

Nov 12, Brenda Gadd rated it it was amazing. I loved this book. Even though there is no scientific way, as yet, to measure the title , How Dogs Love Us. What I loved was following a scientific experiment. You have the idea. You work with an MRI all the time. But no one has really looked at a dog's brain, without sedation. Through an elaborate system of dog training with hot dogs as treats , teaching a dog to wear ear muffs for sound, and hold still All this, is a situation where lawyers and faculty consultants I loved this book.

All this, is a situation where lawyers and faculty consultants must pass on the experiment.

Conducted in a human MRI setting. I really enjoyed the author's insights into "Lab dogs" those bred for science, used by science and cast away. Also for other animals used for science. You have to love science at least a little and dogs a whole lot to love this experiment. Dogs were loved and treated fairly for this experiment. They honored the times the dog wanted to opt out. And the author wants nothing to do with experimental apes I wonder if this is from a scientist's viewpoint.

I wonder more about what he knows. I found this a good read. View 1 comment. I have to say that I expected more from this book based on the title.

Since I am a dog lover, of course I'm going to love the premise of the book, however, it failed to deliver. Maybe it's not the fault of the author as much as it is the fault of technology. The book was slow to develop. Maybe because when it's all said and done the science is still young, but it was I have to say that I expected more from this book based on the title.

Maybe because when it's all said and done the science is still young, but it was enticing nonetheless. I would have liked more of a definitive answer. The story is warm and fuzzy, and the science is approaching believability. As one who actually wants the answers to be strong and definitive, I was rooting for the author. More time is spent on the steps which lead to the fMRI scans which the star canine, Callie, has to go through than on any actual results of the scans themselves.

I still enjoyed the book. Any dog lover will. I'd like a sequel is there one already? If you are a "dog person" and have always wondered if your furry friend saw you as anything more than a source for food or was capable of genuine emotional feelings, this is a "must read" book. Intrigued by the question, "Does my dog love me?

For years, scientists have been able to identify functions, responses, and possible emotions in the human brain by scanning that organ and seeing what areas "light up" during If you are a "dog person" and have always wondered if your furry friend saw you as anything more than a source for food or was capable of genuine emotional feelings, this is a "must read" book.

For years, scientists have been able to identify functions, responses, and possible emotions in the human brain by scanning that organ and seeing what areas "light up" during different stimulation. Theoretically, this should also be something that can be done with a canine.

But, how do you influence a dog to keep its head still long enough for a scan to be accomplished without forcibly restraining it causing anxiety or drugging it deadening responses? And if we learn that dogs have self-awareness and genuine emotions, will that change their legal status from "possessions" to "beings"?

Though intrigued, I began this book with a worry that the scientific jargon likely to be encountered would overwhelm me. I soon learned that I needn't have feared. Terminology is kept to a minimum, and there are many stories about how people interacted with their dogs and how the many hurdles facing The Dog Project were crossed.

There is a collection of wonderful pictures, too. There were at least three observations made from this study that have changed the way in which I've been interacting with Keira, my Japanese Chin.